The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Bipartisan Talks to Find a Solution to Gun Violence

Advertisement


NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

A bipartisan coalition of senators is engaged in talks to address gun violence. It should be noted that this is the first time in years that there has been such a heated discussion of gun violence in the aftermath of a mass shooting.

Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., who was a congressman from Newtown and an elected senator when bullets ripped through Sandy Hook Elementary in late 2012, worked behind the scenes for years to forge some sort of deal.

After the Texas massacre, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., gave the green light to the talks with the goal of securing “a bipartisan solution and putting forward a proposal, if possible, designed to solve this particular problem.

McConnell isn’t interested in some kind of deal that results in a show vote or gives the parties a chance to score political points.

TEXAS SHOOTING SHOWS AMERICA HELD HOSTAGE BY ‘JUMBLED’ SECOND AMENDMENT, LA TIMES COLUMNIST SAYS

Senator John Cornyn, R-Texas, speaks about a proposed Democratic tax plan at the United States Capitol on August 4, 2021 in Washington, DC
(Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

There’s a reason McConnell filled in for Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, on this venture. Not only is Cornyn from Texas, but he is the former Lone Star State Attorney General. In 2018, Cornyn was also instrumental in adding a provision to a big spending bill called the “Fix NICS Act.”

NICS is short for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System. The shooter of a 2017 Sutherland Springs, Texas massacre fell through the cracks. He was an Air Force veteran and shouldn’t have been allowed to buy guns. Cornyn’s disposition tightened the system after the Air Force failed to enter the shooter’s information into the background system.

Here are the most important reasons why Cornyn is key to this process: He is the former Senate GOP whip. Cornyn is used to working with members to understand what they can support and what they can’t. It’s one thing to have Senators Susan Collins, R-Maine; Bill Cassidy, R-La.; and Lindsey Graham, RS.C., on board eager to speak. The key is to expand the coalition

“He (Cornyn) can reach members beyond this group,” a source familiar with the process said.

TEXAS SCHOOL SHOOTING: THE LAST

It’s unclear exactly what lawmakers are working on. Cornyn and others have made it clear that there will be no reinstatement of the assault weapons ban. But there’s a lot of talk about toughening schools, improving mental health procedures, red flag laws and even background checks.

The Senate is on recess until June 6 for the Memorial Day break. For one, the break would seemingly end any momentum the senators might have mustered to resolve the issue. But Murphy thinks recess can actually help in these circumstances.

“It’s easier to work on these issues outside of Washington,” Murphy told reporters. “We love you guys. But sometimes it’s a little easier to negotiate with each other than to negotiate through the Washington, DC press.”

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D.N.Y., arrives for a weekly policy luncheon at the Capitol in Washington on March 8, 2022.
Advertisement

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D.N.Y., arrives for a weekly policy luncheon at the Capitol in Washington on March 8, 2022.
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

That’s why Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, DN.Y., is willing to give the bipartisan coalition some breathing room to work on a plan. Maybe ten days. But Schumer will actually force some sort of gun-related vote if the task force walks away empty-handed.

Schumer and other Democrats are feeling the pressure from the left to act and do it quickly. After all, the Democrats control the majority. And they get hot.

“I’m sure you’ve all heard about the timing,” Greg Jackson of the Community Justice Action Fund said at a gun control rally at the Capitol on Thursday. “We have to find the right time. The right time. The right time. The American people don’t believe (Senator Schumer) is going to do anything about it.”

A survivor of gun violence himself, Jackson did not hold back, lambasting the cooling off period.

“Ten days to deal with the number one killer of black men?” Jackson ased. “Ten f—— days?”

Either way, Murphy is skeptical about getting a deal.

BETO O’ROURKE, GUN CONTROL ADVOCATES PROTEST OUTSIDE OF NRA CONVENTION: ‘SHAME ON YOU’

“I don’t want to overstate my optimism,” Murphy said. “I’ve been Charlie Brown enough to know that, so far, football has been taken away from me every time. Maybe this time it’s different.”

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-California, hosts a press conference at the Capitol Visitor Center to introduce members of the select committee investigating the January 6 attack on the Capitol on July 1, 2021.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-California, hosts a press conference at the Capitol Visitor Center to introduce members of the select committee investigating the January 6 attack on the Capitol on July 1, 2021.
(Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-California, is also willing to let the Senate do what it wants. The key is the Senate and whether it can get a deal. If the Senate can get something done, Pelosi will entertain it in the House. In the meantime, Pelosi is content to introduce legislation in early June “to establish nationwide extreme risk protection orders, which will help keep guns out of reach of those who pose a threat to them- themselves or for others”.

We may not know what the Senate’s bipartisan talks are about. But the success or failure of any package depends on three things: It’s all about math. It’s about math. It’s about math.

NINA JANKOWICZ THINKS DISINFO BOARD IS HELPING ‘RESPONSE’ MASS PRINTS: ‘MISINFORMATION PLAYS A ROLE’

Any eventual bill will need to get 60 yes votes to overcome a buccaneer. That’s why negotiators hope to broaden the talks to secure a substantial coalition of Democrats and Republicans. There’s a universe of 15 to 20 Republicans who might be willing to play ball on this.

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during the Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) annual leadership meeting in Las Vegas on November 5, 2021.

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during the Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) annual leadership meeting in Las Vegas on November 5, 2021.
(Bridget Bennett/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

More conservative members, like Sen. Tommy Tuberville, R-Ala., and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, may be out of reach. But there are plenty of GOPers that aren’t. Similarly, Liberal senators may also be unwilling to accept a proposal that is narrow or does not address assault weapons. Thus, progressive members like Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., can be difficult to fit in.

Senators on the sidelines are, well, on the sidelines. They will suggest that any potential pact either goes too far or doesn’t go far enough. It’s Goldie Locks. Not too hot. Not too cold. But just enough. Negotiators need to find common ground in the middle.

Don’t forget that a few gun measures mark more than 50 years after the Sandy Hook massacre. The Senate finally held a series of gun-related votes in April 2013, four months after the Newtown tragedy. But while proposals could score over 50, nothing could score 60.

That said, if there’s no deal in about a week, Schumer will likely force a vote on guns. He will not manage to get 60 years old. And then everyone will go back to their corner.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Another mass shooting will have come and gone with much talk but little action on Capitol Hill.

You Can Read Also

Sports News

Advertisement

malek

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.