Russia’s struggle in Ukraine raises the question of whether the military has been overrated


NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

As Russia continues its assault on Ukraine and its major cities amid its chaotic military campaign, the difficulties Moscow has faced in trying to make progress have surprised some experts who had predicted Kiev would fall within days.

Two weeks after Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded, his forces were met with determined and unexpected Ukrainian resistance that refused to back down, evidence of the Kremlin’s inability to establish air supremacy, despite a constant barrage of strikes aerial. Its ability to outperform against a larger and better equipped Russian army contrasts with what many had predicted.

Russia outnumbers Ukraine in arms and troops and is used to deploying its military to fight in a number of conflicts. Despite this, the Ukrainian fighters were able to launch counterattacks with regularity.

INVASION IN UKRAINE: RUSSIA ASKS THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL FOR A SPECIAL MEETING ON “BIOLABS”

A destroyed Russian tank is seen Thursday after fighting on a main road near Brovary, north of Kiev, Ukraine.  Russia was expected to overtake the Ukrainian forces within days, but has so far met with strong resistance.

A destroyed Russian tank is seen Thursday after fighting on a main road near Brovary, north of Kiev, Ukraine. Russia was expected to overtake the Ukrainian forces within days, but has so far met with strong resistance.
(AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Partly to blame is Russia’s ineffective planning to coordinate logistics and support efforts and poor leadership, experts said.

“A lot of their problems are logistical and tactical in nature,” retired Green Beret George Fraser told Fox News. “It’s not so much that they have bad tanks or faulty bullets as terrible logistical training and lack training or experience in executing combat tactics.”

Unlike Ukrainians fighting for the survival of their nation, Russian troops are risking their lives as the world continues to unprovokedly condemn their presence in a neighboring country.

Experts initially believed that Russian ground combat forces would overwhelm Ukrainian fighters. However, its combined arms tactics — the integration of combat arms, infantry, armor and aircraft, working together — leave much to be desired, Fraser said.

As the conflict continues to escalate, images and videos posted on social media have given the world a glimpse of what is happening. Many show successful attacks on the ground and in the air against Russian troops while others have captured abandoned enemy vehicles with depleted tires and equipment.

So far, armored vehicles have failed to enter Kiev, the capital, and Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second city, located a few kilometers from the border with Russia. A pinned down military column of tanks and heavy weaponry stretching 40 miles in length which was already moving at a snail’s speed halted its advance a few miles from the capital.

The shutdown puzzled military analysts.

A satellite image shows a military convoy near Invankiv, Ukraine, February 28, 2022. Satellite image 2022

A satellite image shows a military convoy near Invankiv, Ukraine, February 28, 2022. Satellite image 2022
(Maxar Technologies/Document via Reuters)

Moscow’s military strategy contrasts with its 2014 annexation of the Crimean peninsula to Ukraine, Liam Collins, a retired Army special forces officer who served as a defense adviser to Ukraine, told Fox News. Ukraine from 2016 to 2018.

“Russia certainly underperformed, but I don’t think that’s an indictment of their entire military or that we overestimated,” said Collins, founding director of the Modern War Institute. “In 2014 they seemed to have a war plan for Crimea which they dusted off and executed to perfection and this time they had accumulated months and seemed to have no war plan at all.”

Ukraine’s fierce resistance is the result of a number of factors, he said, including its 2016 efforts to reform its military and millions of dollars in aid and military equipment. Another is the culture of military volunteering among Ukrainians, as many have decided not to flee to fight, whether with guns or Molotov cocktails.

Amid its military struggles, Moscow stepped up attacks on civilian targets and in doing so halted evacuation efforts.

“The Kremlin is bombing schools and hospitals, including maternity wards. Moscow is not protecting anyone. It is destroying,” Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksiy Reznikov said Thursday.

In Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, strikes targeted a maternity hospital, Ukrainian president says Volodymyr Zelensky, said Wednesday.

“People, children are under the wreckage. Atrocity!” he tweeted while calling for the establishment of a no-fly zone over Ukrainian skies. “How much longer will the world be an ignorant accomplice to terror?”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Despite the missteps, Fraser warned that Russia still had plenty of troops and it was too early to dismiss their resolve to try to conquer Ukraine.

“Their performance might lead you to say that you have miscalculated the quality of the Russian military, but I would be cautious in that assessment because they still have many units left in Russia that might be of higher caliber in reserve for the possibility of ‘a showdown with NATO if that happened; but there’s a lot of things about how they’re performing in Ukraine that don’t add up,’ he said.

“I think it’s just miscalculations by everyone about everything,” he added. “I don’t know anyone who has a good prediction of how this war played out.”

You Can Read Also

World News

malek

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.