Kavanaugh neighbor describes ‘horrific’ experience dealing with ‘aggressive’ pro-choice protesters

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EXCLUSIVE: Neighbor of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh says pro-choice protesters who marched several times a week down their street in the evening rocked residents’ homes and disrupted their lives – as they detailed alleged abuse suffered by neighbors on the part of protesters, while claiming that authorities have done little to help them.

The neighbor, who spoke to Fox News Digital on condition of anonymity, said that although there had been intermittent protests before, they resumed after the court’s draft notice that would overturn the ruling on the court leaked. Abortion Roe v Wade.

Protesters and drummers marched past the home of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after an alleged assassination attempt.
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Protesters and drummers marched past the home of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after an alleged assassination attempt.
(FoxNews)

The neighbor said it was mostly people from outside the area who were organizing the protests, not people from the area – and elaborated on how it was both regular and organised.

“These are people who come from outside the area. They have a meeting point in a fairly close parking lot,” the source said.

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Protesters typically appear two evenings a week, Wednesdays and Saturdays, and come in the evening around 7 p.m. – when many local residents are putting their children to bed, a task made difficult when loud protesters march down the street. .

“It’s when people put their kids to bed, there are little kids living on the streets. It’s a horrible experience,” the source said. “It’s not great if you have kids of any age but it’s incredibly stressful and the kids are very upset, the kids have to be sent inside and it’s so loud you can’t fall asleep your children.”

“They picked the exact time and they don’t care,” they said. “Literally, there’s no way on a Wednesday night to put your child to bed.”

Although there are ground rules laid down by law enforcement, the source said protesters are loud and intimidating, with chants warning of riots if they don’t get what they want – and there have been instances of protesters also abusing neighbors, they said.

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“They’ve got drummers, they’ve got a megaphone, and they’re singing, they’re shouting all kinds of things… They’ve been telling neighbors ‘f**k you, f**k your children, things like that – and so they are abusive to neighbors and intimidating.”

CHEVY CHASE, MD: Protesters march past the home of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

CHEVY CHASE, MD: Protesters march past the home of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.
(Photo by Nathan Howard/Getty Images)

“They go into the street. We were told that because they will eventually move when a car comes into the street, they are not technically blocking the street,” they said.

The resident notes that there are noise ordinances that restrict things like leaf blowers, and yet those ordinances are apparently not being followed by protesters.

“What we’ve also been told is that it’s ‘behaving within the bounds of the law’ and the only law that could be enforced is federal law that they’re not supposed to demonstrate outside the home. judicial officers, but the federal partners have refused to enforce this law,” they said.

The neighbor pointed out that the lots are relatively small, meaning the houses are right next to the street where protesters are shouting and chanting.

“There’s nowhere to go to get away from it,” they said. “I think people are very concerned that if no action is taken it will escalate in a very unpredictable and very dangerous way and that’s what’s so disheartening is the fact that it doesn’t seem there just isn’t anyone in a position of leadership or authority looking at these issues and acting on them and trying to seek a solution rather than just letting it possibly escalate.”

Officials expressed concern about the security situation related to the leaked draft notice. A recent Department of Homeland Security report said the draft advisory sparked a flurry of threats against officials and others and increased the likelihood of extremist violence. This was underscored on Wednesday when Nicholas John Roske was arrested early Wednesday near Kavanaugh’s home in Maryland after threatening to kill the judge. Police said he was carrying a gun, knife and zip ties.

Some might have expected the protests to resist following the arrest of Roske, who was later charged with the attempted murder of Kavanaugh. But a few hours after the arrest, the same evening, the demonstrators were back.

“They had a lot of camera crews, obviously, who were there for the news,” the neighbor said. “So they came, they had more drums, more noise. They were very, very loud, very, very aggressive. There is no consideration given to neighbors – we are expected to take it.”

The neighbor said there had been very little communication from law enforcement and the community felt “very exhausted”.

“We’ve also been told many times, anecdotally, like in casual conversation, that you can’t engage with these people. They have no filter. They won’t have any regard for your personal property or your personal safety, so don’t engage with them, so we’re basically being told that these people are not safe.

“It takes away your sense of security,” they said. “We have no idea who might fit into this group of protesters.”

The neighbor stressed that no one blamed Kavanaugh himself for the protests that have swept through the area: “He and his family are hurting more than any of us.

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The neighbor said he hoped that once the reported opinion itself was delivered, perhaps a few weeks later, things would calm down – but warned that the protests in their neighborhood had far more implications wide.

The neighbor also challenged politicians who think such protests are okay because they are peaceful to open their neighborhoods to similar protests and make their addresses available to the public.

“Let people know and encourage them to come to your neighborhood and do the same to express their views. Because it can’t be selective,” they said.

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