Afghan women were ordered by the Taliban to cover themselves from head to toe in public

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Taliban leaders have ordered all Afghan Saturday women to wear head-to-toe clothing in public.

The decree recommends women to wear the burqa from head to toe, with women showing only their eyes.

“We want our sisters to live in dignity and security,” Khalid Hanafi, acting minister of the Taliban’s Ministry of Vices and Virtue, reportedly said.

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“For all dignified Afghan women, wearing the hijab is necessary and the best hijab is the chadori (head-to-toe burqa) which is part of our tradition and is respectful,” said Shir Mohammad, an official from the ministry of vice and virtue.

The decree added that if women did not have important work outside, it was better for them to stay at home.

“Islamic principles and Islamic ideology are more important to us than anything else,” Hanafi added.

If a woman violates the rule, her father or closest male relative would be visited, according to Reuters, and risk jail time or state dismissal.

In April, the Taliban banned women from traveling alone – an edict that was quietly ignored.

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In addition, while private schools and universities in Kabul continue to operate, girls have been banned from school beyond sixth grade in most of the country.

The hardline Taliban are backtracking in the country, allowing men and women to visit public parks on different days only and banning the use of cellphones in universities.

International media broadcasts and foreign drama series were canceled in March.

During the former Taliban regime, between 1996 and 2001, similar restrictions applied to women. They were ousted by a US-led coalition for harboring al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

They returned to power after leaving America in the summer of last year.

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In April, the United States defense department found that about $7 billion worth of military equipment transferred to Afghan security forces remained there during the Taliban takeover.

Reuters and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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