Afghan translators, families fear Taliban takeover as they attempt to flee to the United States

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The Taliban are on the march. Since the United States withdrew most of its troops from Afghanistan, militants have increasingly taken over the country. And that worries people who have worked with the United States, like Faridoon Hazeen, 39. They fear being targeted if the Taliban take over.

Since 2012, Hazeen has worked with Americans as a translator as they interviewed high-value terrorist suspects, including members of the Taliban.

“I think as soon as they get here, they’ll kick out people like me who worked or currently work for the US government,” Hazeen told Fox News.

Taliban supporters carry the iconic white Taliban flags in the Afghan-Pakistani border town of Chaman, Pakistan on Wednesday, July 14, 2021 (AP Photo / Tariq Achkzai)
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Taliban supporters carry the iconic white Taliban flags in the Afghan-Pakistani border town of Chaman, Pakistan on Wednesday, July 14, 2021 (AP Photo / Tariq Achkzai)

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He has been trying for years to get a visa to get him, his wife and four children out of the country and out of harm’s way. So far, they have been unlucky.

James Miervaldis, of the No One Left Behind organization, told Fox News: “It is a death sentence for anyone who stands alongside US forces.”

Several hundred Afghans working with the United States have been reported to have been killed by the Taliban in recent years.

Thousands of Afghans who had worked for the United States and their families were displaced from the war-torn country. But it has taken years, and the last American combat troops are expected to disappear in a matter of weeks.

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The Biden administration is finally acting.

Secretary of State Anthony Blinken recently said, “The United States is committed to helping those who have helped us during our time in Afghanistan for the past 20 years.

In fact, in recent days two planes filled with former Afghan American workers and their families have arrived in the United States for treatment. But that’s only about 500. An estimated 70,000 Afghans are due.

“We need to see bigger moves as soon as possible to hopefully get all of our allies out,” Miervaldis said.

With the Taliban’s hindsight, the Biden administration is trying to speed up the process, bringing visa applicants to other countries while further expanding the number of potentially eligible people.

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For translator Hazeen, whose visa application, according to expert analysis, was suspended on a technicality, a change of scenery couldn’t be faster.

“It will be the only way for me to get out of this country, out of the hell that is,” he said.

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