A “fictosexual” Japanese man can no longer communicate with the hologram he married

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A “fictosexual” Japanese man who married a hologram in 2018 recently told a Japanese newspaper that their relationship struggled to communicate.

Akihiko Kondo, 38, who works at a middle school in suburban Tokyo, married Hatsune Miku, a hologram created by a computer as singing software, on November 4, 2018, in a wedding that cost more than 17,000 dollars.

As one of thousands of “fictosexuals”, Kondo is drawn to fictional characters.

Japan's Akihiko Kondo poses with a doll of Japanese virtual reality singer Hatsune Miku, as he shows their marriage certificate, at his apartment in Tokyo on November 10, 2018, a week after he married her.
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Japan’s Akihiko Kondo poses with a doll of Japanese virtual reality singer Hatsune Miku, as he shows their marriage certificate, at his apartment in Tokyo on November 10, 2018, a week after he married her.
(BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP via Getty Images)

Kondo first interacted with Miku using Gatebox, a $1,300 device that projected fictional characters into a cylinder and allowed users to communicate via artificial intelligence and unofficially marry them.

When he proposed to her in the cylinder, Miku reportedly replied, “I hope you will cherish me.”

A 35-YEAR-OLD MAN WOULD MARRY A COMPUTER HOLOGRAM

Since their marriage in 2018, the Gatebox technology no longer exists, which Kondo says has complicated their relationship, but hasn’t eased his feelings.

“My love for Miku hasn’t changed,” he told Japanese newspaper Mainichi, who told how he walked around with a life-size version of the doll. “I arranged the wedding ceremony because I thought I could be with her forever.”

Japan's Akihiko Kondo poses next to a hologram of Japanese virtual reality singer Hatsune Miku at his apartment in Tokyo on November 10, 2018, a week after he married her.

Japan’s Akihiko Kondo poses next to a hologram of Japanese virtual reality singer Hatsune Miku at his apartment in Tokyo on November 10, 2018, a week after he married her.
(BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP via Getty Images)

Recalling what made him step back into a world where he would marry a fictional character, Kondo told Newshub, “It’s not that people can’t live in society because they’re immersed in it. in a two-dimensional world, but rather, there are instances where people become captivated as they seek a place for themselves in video games and anime because the reality is too painful for them.”

“I was one of those people. People who don’t understand the context probably think, ‘Games are disrupting their lives,’ but that’s not the case,” he added.

Japan's Akihiko Kondo poses next to a hologram of Japanese virtual reality singer Hatsune Miku at his apartment in Tokyo on November 10, 2018, a week after he married her.

Japan’s Akihiko Kondo poses next to a hologram of Japanese virtual reality singer Hatsune Miku at his apartment in Tokyo on November 10, 2018, a week after he married her.
(BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP via Getty Images)

Kondo was reportedly bullied at work and fell into a depression in 2008 when he first bumped into Miku and realized human relationships weren’t for him. He credits the Vocaloid software’s voice bank for pulling him out of his depression.

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“I stayed in my room 24 hours a day and watched videos of Miku all the time,” he reminded Mainichi.

Fox News’ Elizabeth Zwirz contributed to this report.

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